4 ways to take better photos when traveling

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Today I have a guest blog from an amazing photographer that is also a client of mine Hannah Baker from www.hanahbaker.co.nz

Hannah is a one of a kind human being and takes the most amazing photos. Hannah specialies in portraits, weddings, engagements, travel and lifestyle photography.

Hannah is a master with her camera and shared with us her 4 top ways to take better photos when travelling.

Everyone loves taking photos!

Chances are you’re out and about, eating good looking food, interesting things are happening around you and you just want to capture it all! But, part of you always wishes you took better photos to show off your story more... here are some quick and easy pointers to sharpen up your photography skills when snapping away.

1. Compose thoughtfully

Naturally we take photos at eye level, this is the easy option instead move your body! Move left, right, tip toe, get down on one knee, varying viewpoint adds variety. Think about what you're trying to portray, not only should you be considering the subject but what else is around it. Often we’re so fixated on the subject we may not notice what else we’re photographing. Check the corners of the photos for distractions. Have you positioned a tree to look like it’s appearing from the top of someones head, or is the horizon line of the ocean cutting right through someone’s neck? Negative space is equally as important as the subject. Ultimately we’re trying to create photographs that are pleasing and easy on the eye.

2. Time of day is key

Consider light, light is everything! Photographing people and landscapes is best in warm light which is found near sunrise and sunset times. (I always try to schedule my shoots towards sunset time to get that beautiful flattering and sometimes golden light). This is a great time for landcapes too with the sun low there’s side lighting giving depth and texture and amazing colours- unlike midday sun, washing out colours and texture. Getting up early can be hard on holiday I know but there’s also something very magical about witnessing a sunrise. If you’re interested in shooting some culture, markets are most intense and interesting in the morning. You’ll be rewarded with experiences and scenes that most people miss while sleeping.

3. Photographing locals

Photographing strangers can be daunting but in my experience people are happy to be photographed and it's a great way to meet new people. On the off chance they’re not, at least you’ve asked right rather than wishing you had. I’m drawn to take photos of locals because they may be doing something interesting, wearing something eye-catching and to me. I let them know what it is that has taken my attention and their response is always positive, everyone appreciates a compliment. Show them your capture and they’ll flash you an amazing smile that you’ll also want to photograph so be ready for that shot too. The in-between the moment shots can quite often be the winners once the person in front of you has relaxed from a camera in their face.

4. Self Portraits vs Selfies

I think a common trait coming through in these pointers is allowing some dedication to taking photos. Selfies, they’re easy and quick sure but they don’t tell much of a visual story. Do I dare say, they’re even….boring. Back the lens away from being so close to you, get your hands on a tripod. The one I like to use is about 15cm high-teeny but certainly does the trick! Show off some wicked landscapes by inserting yourself into the picture. Or- timer mode, hit it and run into your spot!  

This post was written by Hannah from www.hanahbaker.co.nz Get in touch with her to capture your amazing moments. Check out her IG as well @hannahbaker.collection

LifestyleJoanne Whyte